800-541-1285

Indoor soccer safety and maintenance is grossly overlooked. Soccer or Futbol is played by kids, adults, and teens all across the United States in thousands of indoor soccer arenas. Some cities run several indoor soccer arenas with hundreds of people visiting each week to play and watch teams compete. The majority of indoor soccer is played on synthetic turf as the flooring. After a recent perusal of some high-profile websites about running indoor soccer arenas, one thing became clear; no one is talking about protecting kids and adults in these facilities from harmful bacteria like Staph and MRSA.

Indoor Soccer Safety and Maintenance

Significant research has been completed on how synthetic turf has become a factor for bacterial infections like Staph and MRSA. In 2003, 11 out of 106 football players from USC all contracted MRSA. In The Journal of Athletic Training, 2006; 41(2): 141–145, research was published. Outbreak of Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infections Among a Collegiate Football Team MRSA is potentially fatal and can be extremely hard to treat due to its resistance to antibiotics.

Why Do Infections Occur?

Infections in athletes like football players and soccer players happen because synthetic turf, locker rooms, and other surfaces are not properly treated and maintained. Athletes playing on synthetic surfaces are subject to turf burns, minor abrasions, and other small cuts and wounds. When one player spreads bacteria onto the field, it leaves every other player susceptible to that bacteria for as long as the bacteria can remain alive.  Open cuts and wounds are a prime target for MRSA and synthetic turf easily harbors this bacteria. Depending on the type of surface and other conditions, MRSA can remain alive for months! It is critical that we do something to stop the spread of MRSA among athletes and children now.

860 MiniZapr – Indoor Soccer Safety and MRSA Prevention

 

 

The issues with MRSA and other bacterial infections are only recently being linked to synthetic turf.  There are thousands of indoor soccer arenas across the country. What these facilities don’t know is that they could be proliferating the spread of these painful and potentially fatal infections. It is important to educate facility owners and athletic directors about the importance of ridding synthetic fields of harmful bacteria.

How Sports Turf Northwest Can Help

The  860 MiniZapr is the smallest and most portable destroyer of harmful bacteria like MRSA. Using UVC (a unique ultra-violet light) technology, the MiniZapr zaps away bacteria quickly and efficiently. About the size of a lawnmower, it is easy to use and can be plugged into any outlet for supreme portability. If you have questions about safety for soccer players or other athletes, call Sports Turf Northwest for answers. We assist athletic directors and sports facilities across the United States in sourcing all the equipment necessary to keep synthetic turf safe and properly maintained.

Indoor Soccer Arena Photo By Joe Mabel [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)], via Wikimedia Commons

In The Journal of Athletic Training, 2006; 41(2): 141–145. Outbreak of Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infections Among a Collegiate Football Team

AMARomano R, Lu D, Holtom P. Outbreak of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin infections among a collegiate football team. J Athl Train. 2006;41(2):141–145.
MLARomano, Russ et al. “Outbreak of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin infections among a collegiate football team.” Journal of athletic trainingvol. 41,2 (2006): 141-5.
APARomano, R., Lu, D., & Holtom, P. (2006). Outbreak of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin infections among a collegiate football team. Journal of athletic training41(2), 141–145.
NLMRomano R, Lu D, Holtom P. Outbreak of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin infections among a collegiate football team. J Athl Train. 2006;41(2):141-5. PubMed PMID: 16791297; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC1472644.

 

Indoor Futbol Maintenance